Hackers Threaten ‘Game of Thrones,’ as HBO Confirms Cyberattack

Share this

HBO has been the latest target of a cyber-attack. HBO confirmed on Monday that the network had been the target of a cyberattack, as an anonymous hacker boasted about leaking full episodes of upcoming shows along with written material from next week’s episode of “Game of Thrones.” The hack was announced to media via an anonymous email which claimed 1.5 terabytes of data from secure HBO networks was accessed, according to Entertainment Weekly. Unaired episodes of “Ballers” and “Room 104” may have been published online, and the hacker vowed more…

Share this
Read More

Cyber spies use female ‘honey pot’ to lure LinkedIn targets

Share this

MIA Ash is an attractive 30-year-old  British woman with two art school degrees , a successful career as a photographer with hundreds of social media connections. She has common favorite hobbies with social media users, so when she adds a target as a friend,  they probably get flattered and a little bit excited. After exchanging messages on LinkedIn, The target is happy to continue the conversation on Facebook and WhatsApp. One problem though, Mia does not exist. Instead, she’s a persona, her biography fabricated and her photos stolen from another…

Share this
Read More

Microsoft Patches 56 Vulnerabilities

Share this

Microsoft has released an urgent update to stop hackers taking control of computers with a single email. The unusual bug, in Microsoft anti-malware software such as Windows Defender, could be exploited without the recipient even opening the message. Researchers working for Google’s Project Zero cyber-security outfit discovered the flaw at the weekend. The fix has been specially pushed out hours before the software giant’s monthly Tuesday security update. The update CVE-2017-0290 addresses a vulnerability that could allow remote code execution if the Microsoft Malware Protection Engine scans a specially crafted file.…

Share this
Read More

Google’s battle with Android malware: Who wins?

Share this

While most people are aware of the malicious threats targeting their computers, many still don’t realise that their mobile devices are an increasingly lucrative a target for cybercriminals. The main way smartphones are attacked is though apps, often ones which pose as innocent and useful but actually aim to steal data or in the case of ransomware, force users to pay up. Recently, google uncovered the Android version of Pegasus, a mobile spyware created by NSO Group, an Israeli surveillance company considered the most advanced producer of mobile spyware on…

Share this
Read More

Google Docs phishing attack is fixed

Share this

Google Docs users were hit by a widespread phishing attempt everywhere being spammed with what appeared to be malicious invitations to log on to their Google accounts. Unlike your garden-variety cyberattack, many of the telltale signs that could tip off that something was awry are absent. What made this attack so tricky to detect was that it took advantage of Google’s legitimate tool for sharing data with responsible third-party apps. Since the bogus invitation was being routed through Google’s real system, nothing was misspelled, the icons looked accurate, and it’s hard to know something’s…

Share this
Read More

Phishing attacks using internationalized domains are hard to block

Share this

Attackers can evade a security mechanism and abuse Unicode domains to phish for the login credentials of Chrome, Firefox, and Opera users. Security researcher Xudong Zheng has developed a proof-of-concept that exploits an issue in some web browsers. Attackers can abuse this sleight of hand to redirect users to phishing websites. All they need to do is use Punycode, which relies on ASCII characters to convey foreign characters.  The Punycode domain “xn--pple-43d.com” is equivalent to “apple.com”, for example. As long as a web browser translates the Punycode into what’s known…

Share this
Read More

Artificial intelligence could be the key to cyber security

Share this

In a constantly evolving digital threat landscape, where firewalls and antiviruses are considered tools of antiquity, companies are looking to more technologically advanced means of protecting crucial data. Experts point out the cyber-threat landscape has drastically changed and that criminals are now using more artificial intelligence technologies to launch sophisticated attacks. Even a few years ago, launching a distributed denial of service attack to take down a website, defacing webpages and stealing credit card details were considered major instances of cyber-attacks. Today, anything from medical records to airline miles data…

Share this
Read More

Cyber crime is fastest growing economic crime

Share this

Cyber crime is perceived as the fastest growing fraud risk (40%), followed by bribery and corruption (36%)around the globe. The UK has seen a double-digit rise in economic crime against corporates in the past two years, with 55% of organisations affected up 11% since 2014 and well above the US (38%) and China (28%). Globally, the economic crime rate has remained largely static at 36%, according to the survey of more than 6,000 respondents in 115 countries. The survey found that 60 % of economic crime in the UK was…

Share this
Read More

Security of IoT Devices to Be Rated for First Time

Share this

IoT standards groups are emerging to address issues of inter operability, communication protocols and security. Consumer Reports will begin considering the cybersecurity and privacy safeguards of products when rating them – a long overdue move perhaps, given Internet of Things device manufacturers have previously been accused of doing the barest minimum to protect consumers. The firm will steadily implement the methodologies across its reviews, starting with test projects evaluating a small number of products. The move follows a surge in cyberattacks which have exploited vulnerabilities in Internet of Things devices such as webcams, routers, digital video…

Share this
Read More

Security Concerns Rising in the Age of IoT

Share this

IoT has gone mainstream. Home refrigerators are chattier than ever, and emerging virtual home assistants can order wings for dinner, turn on lawn sprinklers, start the car and purchase pounds of cookies. Yet behind the headlines of these gee-whiz cyber technologies lurks a shortcoming. It is one that poses significant threats to national security but could be remedied fairly easily, some experts offer. The mobile device and sensor industries lack uniform security standards and a system of checks and balances—something akin to the safety standards for electrical devices and components…

Share this
Read More