A Hacker Reveals How Your Fingerprint Could Be Easier To Hack Than A Traditional Password

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A hacker has found a way to hack fingerprint passwords — and it’s as easy as taking a clear picture of someone’s hands. At the 31st annual Chaos Computer Club conference in Hamburg, Germany, Popular Science reports a hacker named Jan “Starbug” Krissler pointed out the flaws in biometric password technology, like the fingerprint sensor found on an iPhone 6. Krissler said pictures of people’s hands and fingers can be used to recreate a person’s fingerprint, which can be used to hack into any of their devices that require fingerprint password…

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Businesses neglect Internet security to protect reputation

Internet
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VietNamNet Bridge – Most Vietnamese companies are negligent when it comes to protecting their information on the Internet, VNCERT director Vu Quoc Khanh told Kinh Te & Do Thi (Economic and Urban Affairs) newspaper. Why do businesses attacked by hackers often hesitate to publicise information about the attacks? Recent attacks, especially the incident involving VC Corp’s websites, show that any organisation or business can be a potential target for hackers. However, most businesses prefer not to say anything about such attacks to protect their reputation. They only start asking for…

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Facebook, Apple, And Microsoft Are Ganging Up On Google — And It Couldn’t Happen At A Worse Time

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Back in the old days, the big bad company in tech that all the other companies teamed-up against was Microsoft. Microsoft was the evil empire. So, Apple and Google worked together to squash Microsoft. Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs used to mentor Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Google CEO Eric Schmidt used to sit on the Apple board. This is no longer the case. These days, the common enemy is Google. In recent years, there have been a number of explicit and implicit partnerships between the three biggest…

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Google Shuts Spanish Google News Service, Spanish Government Says It Has no Plans to Modify Law That Prompted Google’s Move

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BBC News: Madrid Online search giant Google is shutting down its Google News service in Spain before a new intellectual property law is introduced. Google will shut the service on 16 December before the law comes into effect in January, the firm said. The law allows Spanish publications to charge services like Google News if their content is shown on the site. But Google has argued against the ruling, saying that it makes no money from its search-based service. “It’s with real sadness that on 16 December we’ll remove Spanish…

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WSJ: U.S. technology companies are in a pitched battle with Europe’s sovereign states

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Discontent on Continent Highlights Battle Over Economics, Culture, Internet Control BRUSSELS—From Berlin to Madrid, from London to Paris, U.S. technology companies are in a pitched battle with Europe’s sovereign states. It is a clash that pits governments against the new tech titans, established industries against upstart challengers, and freewheeling American business culture against a more regulated European framework. And it poses one of the greatest threats to U.S. technology giants since their emergence from garages and college campuses over the past four decades. First and foremost, the battle is about…

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The cyberattack on Sony Pictures made employees collateral damage

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The wave of cyberattacks of large retailers, from Target to Home Depot, over the past year have made hacks feel like a fact of life for many consumers. But the alleged breach at Sony Pictures last week hints at a future where such attacks are more invasive than a stolen credit card: Documents allegedly leaked include Social Security numbers, salary information and even employee performance reviews. The leaked documents, first reported on by Kevin Roose at Fusion, have not yet been verified by Sony. But a memo sent to employees by Sony Pictures executives obtained by the…

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European Regulators Publish Right To Be Forgotten Guidelines

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Europe’s Article 29 Working Party, the body comprised of data protection representatives from individual Member States of the European Union, has now published guidelines on the implementation of the so-called right to be forgotten ruling, which was handed down by Europe’s top court back in May. The European Court of Justice Right To Be Forgotten ruling gives private individuals in Europe the right to request that search engines de-index specific URLs attached to search results for their name — if the information being associated with their name is inaccurate, outdated or irrelevant. The ruling…

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Black Friday – consumers warned to be vigilant

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On the eve of the much-anticipated retail focused sale and discount event, Black Friday, consumers in key regions across Africa, such as Kenya, are warned by network security experts to be vigilant. Black Friday and Cyber Monday are acknowledged as two of the busiest shopping days of the year, involving contribution by social networks and ecommerce websites. Global network security company Fortinet, and its research division FortiGuard Labs, are warning shoppers to be wary. The Company has issued important tips than can keep consumers safe, both when shopping online or…

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WashingtonPost: Why Obama’s plan to save the Internet could actually ruin it

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On Monday, President Obama joined the chorus of those urging FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler to inject federal and state regulators directly into the heart of the Internet, “reclassifying” wired and mobile broadband ISPs as public utilities under a 1934 law written to control the former Bell telephone monopoly. While Obama has long supported the notoriously slippery idea of “net neutrality,” this is the first time the White House has explicitly asked the FCC to take specific action, let alone to embrace the most radical and legally uncertain approach being considered…

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Facebook secretly working on new website called ‘Facebook at Work’ for office use

London (AFP) – Facebook is preparing a new office version of its social networking site to compete with other sites like LinkedIn, the Financial Times reported on Monday. “Facebook is secretly working on a new website called ‘Facebook at Work’” that would allow users to “chat with colleagues, connect with professional contacts and collaborate over documents”, it said. Facebook last month reported its quarterly profit nearly doubled to $802 million (640 million euros) but saw its stock pounded after outlining a plan to invest heavily in the future instead of…

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