Most U.S consumers ‘unlikely’ to purchase or use bitcoin

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A study conducted by the Massachusetts Division of Banks on the bitcoin use found that close to two – thirds of those who responded said they were unlikely to buy or use the virtual currency. The article by Andrew Moran also highlights a study from the U.K. where 71 percent of British consumers don’t want to use bitcoin for their shopping needs. Of course we are very early in the game and the age of the respondent’s matters, those in their late teens and twenties may be more willing to…

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Reuters: Time Warner Cable suffers major outage

Liquid Telecom
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(Adds Time Warner’s comment) By Jim Finkle, Marina Lopes and Alina Selyukh Aug 27 (Reuters) – Time Warner Cable Inc , the No. 2 U.S. cable operator, suffered a massive network outage on Wednesday due to suspected human error that cut Internet services to some 11 million businesses and residences, prompting a New York state investigation. The outage to all of its Internet customers across 29 states began at about 4:30 a.m. EDT (0830 GMT), said company spokesman Bobby Amirshahi. Services were restored by 7.30 a.m, he said. The outage…

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Google, five Asian telecom firms partner to build $300 million undersea cable to Japan

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(Reuters) – Search engine Google Inc and five Asian telecom and communications companies have agreed to invest about $300 million to develop and operate an undersea cable trans-Pacific cable network connecting the United States to Japan. To be named “FASTER,” the cable network will have an initial capacity of 60 terabits per second and will connect Los Angeles, Portland, San Francisco, Oregon and Seattle to Chikura and Shima in Japan. NEC Corp, which will be the system supplier for the undersea cable network, said in a statement that construction would…

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Understanding the Copyright’s Volition Requirement After Aereo

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Jonathan’s post continues DisCo’s ongoing coverage of the Aereo case.  Last week, Prof. Michael Carrier wrote a post for DisCo on the possible effect of Aereo on investment.  Previously, DisCo writer Matt Schruers guest-posted on SCOTUSblog about how Aereo creates uncertainty for the cloud. One of the great attractions (or frustrations) of copyright law is that it is based on metaphysical distinctions. The most obvious of these is the idea/expression dichotomy. The Second Circuit in Computer Associates v. Altai observed that “drawing the line between idea and expression is a tricky business.”…

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Big IT vs SME IT in government – it’s really about changing IT suppliers’ behaviour

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The Cabinet Office plan to bring in more SME IT suppliers and reduce dependence on the old “oligopoly” of big systems integrators (SIs) was always going to come under greater scrutiny once some of those SIs saw their lucrative outsourcing deals come to an end. The Financial Times ran a strange article recently featuring unattributed claims that ministers including business secretary Vince Cable were telling David Cameron that the pro-SME IT policy was wrong, after his department suffered email problems soon after it transitioned away from a Fujitsu mega-outsourcing deal.…

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Report: NSA was allowed to spy on Africa since 2010

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Virtually no foreign government is off-limits for the National Security Agency, which has been authorized to intercept information “concerning” all but four countries, according to top-secret documents. The United States has long had broad no-spying arrangements with those four countries — Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand — in a group known collectively with the United States as the Five Eyes. But a classified 2010 legal certification and other documents indicate the NSA has been given a far more elastic authority than previously known, one that allows it to intercept…

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Germany cancels Verizon contract over spying anxiety

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The German government has cancelled a contract with Verizon over concern that US firms may be giving data to US authorities. Verizon has provided internet services to a number of German government departments and the current contract was due to run out in 2015. The firm did not comment on the move. There was anger in Germany over allegations that a US agency bugged Chancellor Angela Merkel’s phone. Earlier this month Germany announced an investigation into those allegations which were made by a former contractor of the US National Security…

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Tim Wu,The Father of Net Neutrality Returns to Do Battle With Comcast

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Tim Wu saw firsthand how people can mess with the internet. Fifteen years ago, he landed a marketing job with a network equipment maker called Riverstone Networks. Riverstone made network routers, among other things, and it sold many of these to Chinese internet service providers who then used them to block traffic on their networks. After about a year, he left Riverstone, disillusioned but wiser. And today, Wu says that the time he spent there helped cement the idea that has made him famous: net neutrality. First proposed in a…

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Right to Be Forgotten: Google must block a group of websites worldwide Rules Canadian Court

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On the heels of Europe’s “Right to Be Forgotten” ruling, a British Columbia court in Canada has ruled Google must block a group of websites worldwide. The case was opened by industrial networking devices manufacturer Equustek Solutions, Inc. to block a network of websites it claims are owned by former associates who stole trade secrets to illegally manufacture and sell competing products. According to a report from the The Globe and Mail, a temporary injunction against Google was issued last Friday in spite of Google’s protests that Canadian courts had no…

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GCIG: No Single Overarching Cyberspace Regime will emerge in near future

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“There are many potential paths along which cyber norms may evolve” Like-minded states cooperating together, not an overarching global agreement, is likely to emerge as the primary way to avoid destabilisation in cyberspace, according to the first working paper of the Global Commission on Internet Governance (GCIG), an independent, non-partisan think tank on international governance. In The Regime Complex for Managing Global Cyber Activities, Professor Joseph S. Nye, Jr. said “it is unlikely that there will be a single overarching regime for cyberspace any time soon.” In his assessment of…

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