Uber Paid Hackers to Delete Stolen Data on 57 Million People

Share this

Hackers stole the personal data of 57 million customers and drivers from Uber Technologies Inc., a massive breach that the company concealed for more than a year. This week, the ride-hailing firm ousted its chief security officer and one of his deputies for their roles in keeping the hack under wraps, which included a $100,000 payment to the attackers. Compromised data from the October 2016 attack included names, email addresses and phone numbers of 50 million Uber riders around the world, the company told Bloomberg on Tuesday. The personal information…

Share this
Read More

Phishing Makes It Easy To Hijack Accounts

Share this

Cyber-thieves grab almost 250,000 valid log-in names and passwords for Google accounts every week, suggests research. The study by Google and UC Berkeley looked at the ways email and other accounts get hijacked. It used 12 months of log-in and account data found on websites and criminal forums or which had been harvested by hacking tools. Google said the research helped secure accounts by showing how people fell victim to scammers and hackers. During the 12 months studying the underground markets, the researchers identified more than 788,000 credentials stolen via…

Share this
Read More

Covert influence, the new money laundering

Share this

Google is the most recent company known to have discovered evidence of Russian covert influence on its books. As more media companies realize Russia bought advertising space or promoted news stories, fake and otherwise, on their platforms, covert influence has become the new money laundering. Both activities hide below the surface of legitimate enterprises, cast a shadow of disrepute on those very enterprises and can be neutralized through transparency and accountability. Anti-money laundering laws provide useful lessons for combating covert influence and could be adapted for online media models that do…

Share this
Read More

Gambling companies warned against using images appealing to children

Share this

Britain’s betting industry faces its biggest crackdown on child gambling after regulators demanded that operators pull hundreds of casino games, that contain graphics and images that are likely to be attractive to minors, from their websites. Regulators said the “unacceptable” ads and third-party media, should be “immediately” removed or amended adding that this particularly applied to adverts for free and pay-to-play games. In a joint letter, the regulators said under-18s and other vulnerable people should be protected from exploitation. The Gambling Commission, the Advertising Standards Authority, the Committee of Advertising…

Share this
Read More

New Bluetooth vulnerability can hack a phone in 10 seconds

Share this

More than 5 billion devices are vulnerable to a “highly infectious” malware attack. Go ahead, blame the internet of things. More than 5.3 billion devices with Bluetooth signals are at risk of a malware attack newly identified by an internet of things security company. If you’re not keeping count, that’s most of the estimated 8.2 billion devices that use Bluetooth, which allows for our  gadgets to connect and communicate in wireless. Nearly every connected device out there has Bluetooth capability. Your phones, laptops, speakers, car entertainment systems — the list goes…

Share this
Read More

How to spot a phishing email

Share this

Phishing emails flow into inboxes year-round, especially during the holidays. Here are some clues to help your users spot “fishy” emails. Every day these countless phishing emails are sent to unsuspecting victims all over the world. While some of these messages are so outlandish that they are obvious frauds, others can be a bit more convincing. So how do you tell the difference between a phishing message and a legitimate message? Unfortunately, there is no one single technique that works in every situation, but there are a number of things…

Share this
Read More

New malware masquerades as a ride-sharing app

Share this

An update to the venerable Faketoken.q Android malware has made it easier for the program to steal your credit card information from ride-sharing apps. Faketoken attacks Russian ride-sharing apps by overlaying text boxes on the credit card information pages that can capture your credit number and other important information. Kaspersky writes: After getting onto a smartphone (judging by the malware icon, Faketoken infiltrates smartphones through bulk SMS messages with a prompt to download some picture) and installing the necessary modules, the Trojan hides its shortcut icon and starts background monitoring…

Share this
Read More

Internet providers could easily snoop on your smart home

Share this

IoT devices often identify themselves voluntarily, usually by connecting to specific domains or URLs. Even if they didn’t, there are simple ways of profiling them based on observation and some known data. It’s certainly true that encryption is on the rise online. Data from Mozilla, the company behind the popular Firefox browser, shows that more than half of web pages use HTTPS, the standard way of encrypting web traffic. When sites like The Atlantic use HTTPS, a lock icon appears in users’ web browsers, indicating that the information being sent…

Share this
Read More

Are Data Brokers Actually Secure?

Share this

Are you an internet privacy fanatic? Do you block browser tracking cookies? Do you use Duck Duck Go for anonymous web searches? It doesn’t matter now. Your internet service provider (ISP) or your browser extensions can collect and sell your web-browsing history even if you take the above precautions. And anyone who obtains that data, whether the data is anonymized or not, will likely be able to figure out your real name and see exactly what you do online. Back in March the well-publicised repeal of Obama’s broadband privacy regulations…

Share this
Read More

Hackers Threaten ‘Game of Thrones,’ as HBO Confirms Cyberattack

Share this

HBO has been the latest target of a cyber-attack. HBO confirmed on Monday that the network had been the target of a cyberattack, as an anonymous hacker boasted about leaking full episodes of upcoming shows along with written material from next week’s episode of “Game of Thrones.” The hack was announced to media via an anonymous email which claimed 1.5 terabytes of data from secure HBO networks was accessed, according to Entertainment Weekly. Unaired episodes of “Ballers” and “Room 104” may have been published online, and the hacker vowed more…

Share this
Read More