New Bluetooth vulnerability can hack a phone in 10 seconds

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More than 5 billion devices are vulnerable to a “highly infectious” malware attack. Go ahead, blame the internet of things. More than 5.3 billion devices with Bluetooth signals are at risk of a malware attack newly identified by an internet of things security company. If you’re not keeping count, that’s most of the estimated 8.2 billion devices that use Bluetooth, which allows for our  gadgets to connect and communicate in wireless. Nearly every connected device out there has Bluetooth capability. Your phones, laptops, speakers, car entertainment systems — the list goes…

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How to spot a phishing email

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Phishing emails flow into inboxes year-round, especially during the holidays. Here are some clues to help your users spot “fishy” emails. Every day these countless phishing emails are sent to unsuspecting victims all over the world. While some of these messages are so outlandish that they are obvious frauds, others can be a bit more convincing. So how do you tell the difference between a phishing message and a legitimate message? Unfortunately, there is no one single technique that works in every situation, but there are a number of things…

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New malware masquerades as a ride-sharing app

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An update to the venerable Faketoken.q Android malware has made it easier for the program to steal your credit card information from ride-sharing apps. Faketoken attacks Russian ride-sharing apps by overlaying text boxes on the credit card information pages that can capture your credit number and other important information. Kaspersky writes: After getting onto a smartphone (judging by the malware icon, Faketoken infiltrates smartphones through bulk SMS messages with a prompt to download some picture) and installing the necessary modules, the Trojan hides its shortcut icon and starts background monitoring…

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Internet providers could easily snoop on your smart home

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IoT devices often identify themselves voluntarily, usually by connecting to specific domains or URLs. Even if they didn’t, there are simple ways of profiling them based on observation and some known data. It’s certainly true that encryption is on the rise online. Data from Mozilla, the company behind the popular Firefox browser, shows that more than half of web pages use HTTPS, the standard way of encrypting web traffic. When sites like The Atlantic use HTTPS, a lock icon appears in users’ web browsers, indicating that the information being sent…

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Are Data Brokers Actually Secure?

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Are you an internet privacy fanatic? Do you block browser tracking cookies? Do you use Duck Duck Go for anonymous web searches? It doesn’t matter now. Your internet service provider (ISP) or your browser extensions can collect and sell your web-browsing history even if you take the above precautions. And anyone who obtains that data, whether the data is anonymized or not, will likely be able to figure out your real name and see exactly what you do online. Back in March the well-publicised repeal of Obama’s broadband privacy regulations…

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Hackers Threaten ‘Game of Thrones,’ as HBO Confirms Cyberattack

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HBO has been the latest target of a cyber-attack. HBO confirmed on Monday that the network had been the target of a cyberattack, as an anonymous hacker boasted about leaking full episodes of upcoming shows along with written material from next week’s episode of “Game of Thrones.” The hack was announced to media via an anonymous email which claimed 1.5 terabytes of data from secure HBO networks was accessed, according to Entertainment Weekly. Unaired episodes of “Ballers” and “Room 104” may have been published online, and the hacker vowed more…

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Cyber spies use female ‘honey pot’ to lure LinkedIn targets

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MIA Ash is an attractive 30-year-old  British woman with two art school degrees , a successful career as a photographer with hundreds of social media connections. She has common favorite hobbies with social media users, so when she adds a target as a friend,  they probably get flattered and a little bit excited. After exchanging messages on LinkedIn, The target is happy to continue the conversation on Facebook and WhatsApp. One problem though, Mia does not exist. Instead, she’s a persona, her biography fabricated and her photos stolen from another…

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Over 36.5 million Android users get infected by Judy Malware

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A new malware named ‘Judy’ has been found in over 41 apps on the Google Play Store, and it has infected between 8.5 million to 36.5 million users. This is according to a report from security research firm Check Point, which discovered the malware and alerted Google. The search giant has started removing these infected apps from the Play Store. According to researchers from Check Point, the apps were available on the Play Store for years, but have been clean and virus-free for most of the time. It appears that…

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Machine learning set to Impact Online Security

Artificial Intelligence
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Technology moves swiftly. Nowhere is that more accurate than in the current state of machine learning. A lack of awareness of security issues in the C-Suite and among employees is part of the problem, but the major cause is the enormous complexity of modern infrastructure deployments and the data generated by corporate and government networks. Finding security breaches is incredibly difficult. Online criminals want to remain hidden — if they’re discovered, it’s game over. They invest significant resources into hiding their presence, but it’s impossible for them to hide completely. There…

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Google’s battle with Android malware: Who wins?

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While most people are aware of the malicious threats targeting their computers, many still don’t realise that their mobile devices are an increasingly lucrative a target for cybercriminals. The main way smartphones are attacked is though apps, often ones which pose as innocent and useful but actually aim to steal data or in the case of ransomware, force users to pay up. Recently, google uncovered the Android version of Pegasus, a mobile spyware created by NSO Group, an Israeli surveillance company considered the most advanced producer of mobile spyware on…

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